CHP team gets a boost

Growing demand for mini-CHP (combined heat and power) systems has prompted Baxi-SenerTec UK to further increase its technical support team.
Service engineer David Pitchford has been recruited to join the current team of Stephen Miller and Paul Brookes and will be responsible for servicing and commissioning the company’s Dachs units throughout the Midlands, Wales and the south of England.
The Dachs mini-CHP is designed to be installed as the lead boiler in a range of applications. The company reported a doubling in sales last year as more building owners and occupiers looked for ways to shrink their carbon footprint and reduce energy bills.
CHP is the simultaneous generation of usable heat and power (usually electricity) in a single process. The CHP engine drives a generator, which also produces heat that is captured and diverted to provide space and water heating in a building.
Baxi-SenerTec’s Dachs engines, built in Germany, are designed to be robust and reliable so will run for hundreds of thousands of hours. They can deliver up to 440 MWh of electricity and 1,200 MWh of usable heat at a combined efficiency of over 90% during their working life. They will also reduce carbon emissions by over 100 tonnes during their operating life compared with conventional methods of delivering heating and electricity.
By generating electricity at or close to the point of use, CHP is a great alternative to conventional power stations, which are less than 35% efficient due to transmission losses and energy being lost as waste heat from cooling towers.
Mini-CHP is also being widely adopted by building owners required to comply with the revised Part L of the Building Regulations creating further demand for the Dachs engines and Baxi-SenerTec’s technical support team.
“CHP is an extremely mature technology that is enjoying a renaissance in many parts of Europe,” says David Shaw, Business Manager of Baxi-SenerTec. “It is tried and tested and does not depend on weather or ground conditions or any other unpredictable factors. It is also not a borrowed technology, but is designed specifically for the purpose.
 “Mini-CHP can be adopted to complement conventional boiler plant without a need to reconfigure existing pipework and internal heat emitters. This means users can start to enjoy carbon and energy savings quicker without the major expenditure and upheaval required to integrate renewables.”

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